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Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, Kiel

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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2023-01-04
    Description: In spite of current multiple political crises, global warming will remain a prime issue on the global agenda. The adoption of the Paris Agreement in 2015 and its quick ratification in 2016 have created a strong momentum for worldwide action against climate change. As global greenhouse gas emissions must decline towards levels close to zero by the middle of the century, the rapid decarbonisation of energy systems is high on the agenda of most countries around the globe. This publication delivers insights into cutting edge research on the necessary transitions towards low carbon societies and by this aims to contribute to international as well as national policymaking. The topics covered in more than 20 concise original articles are among the most important issues for progressing solutions for climate change and sustainable development. The papers discuss recent findings and case studies in the following subject areas: Governance of the necessary long-term transitions in the context of potential known and unknown adverse developments; Policy instruments and strategies that allow for financing the transition to low carbon economies and, at the same time, respond to today's economic and social challenges; Integrated strategies for three of the most important arenas of global decarbonisation: Cities, as much of the change and necessary investment for low carbon societies must take place, be planned, be financed and be built in cities; industry, particularly the energy-intensive processing industries, which are at the core of society's metabolism and are responsible for a large and growing share of global emissions and science as a whole, which must become more solutions-oriented because the transitions needed will rely heavily on research providing solutions for technological as well as societal problems. As a contribution to these great challenges and at the request of the G7 Environment Ministers, the Low Carbon Society Research Network (LCS-RNet) acts as a forum aimed at fostering research and policymaking to jointly achieve decarbonised energy systems in countries around the world. It convenes leading scientists, practitioners and policymakers and aims at supporting governments in proceeding jointly towards the design and implementation of climate-friendly low carbon societies.
    Keywords: Ökologie ; Ecology ; Ökologie und Umwelt ; Ecology, Environment ; Energiepolitik ; Energieerzeugung ; erneuerbare Energie ; Klimapolitik ; Klimaschutz ; Treibhauseffekt ; internationales Abkommen ; nachhaltige Entwicklung ; Politikumsetzung ; energy policy ; energy production ; renewable energy ; climate policy ; climate protection ; greenhouse effect ; international agreement ; sustainable development ; policy implementation
    Type: Sammelwerk , collection
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  • 2
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    DEU | Berlin
    In:  2005-105 | Discussion Papers / Wissenschaftszentrum Berlin für Sozialforschung, Forschungsschwerpunkt Zivilgesellschaft, Konflikte und Demokratie, Abteilung Zivilgesellschaft und transnationale Netzwerke | 61
    Publication Date: 2018-07-27
    Description: "Zwischen 1998 und 2004 haben die Ausschüsse am Britischen Parlament 15 Online- Anhörungen (online consultations) durchgeführt. Die dabei gemachten Erfahrungen sind interessant vor dem Hintergrund von Bestrebungen, die Kommunikation zwischen Parlament und Öffentlichkeit zu intensivieren, die repräsentative Demokratie durch partizipative Elemente zu stärken und nicht zuletzt auch die Rolle des Parlaments gegenüber der Regierung aufzuwerten. In Studie I wurde untersucht, inwiefern die Einführung netzbasierter Kommunikationskanäle die Anhörungspraxis transformiert hat, wie Best Practice definiert wurde und wie groß die Resonanz in der Öffentlichkeit war. Dazu wurde auf der Grundlage von Evaluationsberichten und den Webpräsenzen (sofern noch verfügbar) ein Überblick über alle Online-Anhörungen erstellt. In Studie II wurden halbstrukturierte Interviews geführt, um zu erkunden, wie die Online-Anhörungen von beteiligten Abgeordneten retrospektiv bewertet wurden. Es zeigte sich, dass sich Online-Anhörungen von der bisherigen Anhörungspraxis in dreierlei Hinsicht unterschieden: durch die direkte Ansprache von Bürgern, durch ein interaktives Diskussionsformat sowie durch die Kooperation mit zivilgesellschaftlichen Akteuren (insbesondere zur Rekrutierung von Teilnehmern), dass Online-Anhörungen in die offiziellen Richtlinien zur Durchführung von Anhörungen aufgenommen wurden und dass sich in der Regel zwischen 50 und 100 Personen aktiv an den Online-Anhörungen beteiligten, wobei insgesamt zwischen 100 und 400 Stellungnahmen abgegeben wurden. Die befragten Abgeordneten glaubten, dass zukünftig noch mehr Bürger online gehört werden wollen und sahen sich deswegen in der Pflicht, schon jetzt mit diesem Instrument zu experimentieren. Darüber hinaus hätten die Online-Anhörungen schon jetzt dabei geholfen, dem Parlament und den behandelten Themen mehr Aufmerksamkeit in der Öffentlichkeit zu verleihen, die eigene Informationsgrundlage zu validieren, und die eigene Politik durch Zitieren von Bürger-Äußerungen aus den Online-Anhörungen überzeugender darzustellen." (Autorenreferat)
    Description: "At the British parliament 15 online consultations were carried out by committees and all-party groups between 1998 and 2004. These exercises are interesting against the background of efforts to intensify communication between parliament and the public, to strengthen representative democracy through participatory politics, and to give more weight to parliament relative to government. Study I investigated to what degree the new communication medium has transformed the consultation practice, how best practice was defined and how big the response from the public was. Evaluation reports and websites (if still available) were analyzed to yield a comparative overview of all online consultations. Study II employed interviews to find out how members of parliament assessed their experience with online consultations. The results show that online consultations differed from traditional consultation practices in at least three ways: they addressed citizens directly, they were characterized by an interactive discussion format, and there was some cooperation with civil society organisations (especially for the purpose of recruiting participants). Further, online consultations were incorporated into official guidelines for committee work. On average, about 50 to 100 people participated actively in the online consultations, contributing between 100 and 400 messages. Members of parliament thought that in the future more people would want to be consulted online, which would justify early experimentation with online consultations early. However, they also said that they had profited already from online consultations in direct ways: Online consultations helped to raise awareness of the topic and the parliament in general, to validate their own informational basis, and to convey their own policy in a more convincing way by the use of quotes from messages by citizens." (author's abstract)
    Keywords: News media, journalism, publishing ; Political science ; Politikwissenschaft ; Publizistische Medien, Journalismus,Verlagswesen ; Interactive, electronic Media ; Political Process, Elections, Political Sociology, Political Culture ; interaktive, elektronische Medien ; politische Willensbildung, politische Soziologie, politische Kultur ; Öffentlichkeit ; computervermittelte Kommunikation ; Parlament ; Kommunikation ; Information ; Abgeordneter ; politische Kommunikation ; Online-Medien ; politische Partizipation ; repräsentative Demokratie ; politische Kultur ; Großbritannien ; Internet ; Zivilgesellschaft ; civil society ; communication ; Internet ; computer-mediated communication ; political communication ; parliament ; the public ; political culture ; information ; representative ; political participation ; online media ; representative democracy ; Great Britain ; empirisch ; empirisch-quantitativ ; anwendungsorientiert ; empirical ; applied research ; quantitative empirical
    Type: Arbeitspapier , working paper
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  • 3
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    Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
    In:  Polar Record | Vol. 58 | Iss. (Art. No.:) e20 | p. 1-12 | Cambridge University Press | Cambridge | ISSN 1475-3057 | doi:10.1017/S0032247422000158
    Publication Date: 2023-03-02
    Description: It has been argued that science diplomacy (SD) helps avoid or mitigate conflicts among stakeholders in the Arctic. Yet underlying some of these well-intended and sometimes successful initiatives is a one-sided understanding of SD. The most recent literature takes a more differentiated approach towards the means and ends of SD. It shows that international scientific interaction is shaped by the twofold logic of competition and collaboration. Instruments of SD can be meant to serve national interests, collective regional goals or global agendas. The present paper disentangles these confounding discourses of collaboration and competition based on a conceptually enhanced SD framework. It analyses Arctic strategies and two cases of Arctic SD, the Agreement on Enhancing International Arctic Scientific Cooperation and research activities on Svalbard, to reveal the mechanisms of collaboration and competition in the sphere of international science in relation to security, environment and economy. By pointing out where and how science is currently being used in the Arctic, this article provides (a) a systematic overview of the state of SD in the region and (b) a tool for policy-makers and scientists to assess what impact different facets of SD have in Arctic politics.
    Keywords: arctic governance ; science diplomacy ; collaboration ; competition ; qualitative content analysis
    Language: English
    Type: Article
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  • 4
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    Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
    In:  Polar Record | Vol. 58 | Iss. (Art. No.:) e20 | p. 1-12 | Cambridge University Press | Cambridge | ISSN 1475-3057 | doi:10.1017/S0032247422000158
    Publication Date: 2023-03-05
    Description: It has been argued that science diplomacy (SD) helps avoid or mitigate conflicts among stakeholders in the Arctic. Yet underlying some of these well-intended and sometimes successful initiatives is a one-sided understanding of SD. The most recent literature takes a more differentiated approach towards the means and ends of SD. It shows that international scientific interaction is shaped by the twofold logic of competition and collaboration. Instruments of SD can be meant to serve national interests, collective regional goals or global agendas. The present paper disentangles these confounding discourses of collaboration and competition based on a conceptually enhanced SD framework. It analyses Arctic strategies and two cases of Arctic SD, the Agreement on Enhancing International Arctic Scientific Cooperation and research activities on Svalbard, to reveal the mechanisms of collaboration and competition in the sphere of international science in relation to security, environment and economy. By pointing out where and how science is currently being used in the Arctic, this article provides (a) a systematic overview of the state of SD in the region and (b) a tool for policy-makers and scientists to assess what impact different facets of SD have in Arctic politics.
    Keywords: arctic governance ; science diplomacy ; collaboration ; competition ; qualitative content analysis
    Language: English
    Type: Article
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  • 5
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    Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
    In:  Polar Record | Vol. 58 | Iss. (Art. No.:) e20 | p. 1-12 | Cambridge University Press | Cambridge | ISSN 1475-3057 | doi:10.1017/S0032247422000158
    Publication Date: 2023-03-10
    Description: It has been argued that science diplomacy (SD) helps avoid or mitigate conflicts among stakeholders in the Arctic. Yet underlying some of these well-intended and sometimes successful initiatives is a one-sided understanding of SD. The most recent literature takes a more differentiated approach towards the means and ends of SD. It shows that international scientific interaction is shaped by the twofold logic of competition and collaboration. Instruments of SD can be meant to serve national interests, collective regional goals or global agendas. The present paper disentangles these confounding discourses of collaboration and competition based on a conceptually enhanced SD framework. It analyses Arctic strategies and two cases of Arctic SD, the Agreement on Enhancing International Arctic Scientific Cooperation and research activities on Svalbard, to reveal the mechanisms of collaboration and competition in the sphere of international science in relation to security, environment and economy. By pointing out where and how science is currently being used in the Arctic, this article provides (a) a systematic overview of the state of SD in the region and (b) a tool for policy-makers and scientists to assess what impact different facets of SD have in Arctic politics.
    Keywords: arctic governance ; science diplomacy ; collaboration ; competition ; qualitative content analysis
    Language: English
    Type: Article
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  • 6
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    Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
    In:  Polar Record | Vol. 58 | Iss. (Art. No.:) e20 | p. 1-12 | Cambridge University Press | Cambridge | ISSN 1475-3057 | doi:10.1017/S0032247422000158
    Publication Date: 2023-03-11
    Description: It has been argued that science diplomacy (SD) helps avoid or mitigate conflicts among stakeholders in the Arctic. Yet underlying some of these well-intended and sometimes successful initiatives is a one-sided understanding of SD. The most recent literature takes a more differentiated approach towards the means and ends of SD. It shows that international scientific interaction is shaped by the twofold logic of competition and collaboration. Instruments of SD can be meant to serve national interests, collective regional goals or global agendas. The present paper disentangles these confounding discourses of collaboration and competition based on a conceptually enhanced SD framework. It analyses Arctic strategies and two cases of Arctic SD, the Agreement on Enhancing International Arctic Scientific Cooperation and research activities on Svalbard, to reveal the mechanisms of collaboration and competition in the sphere of international science in relation to security, environment and economy. By pointing out where and how science is currently being used in the Arctic, this article provides (a) a systematic overview of the state of SD in the region and (b) a tool for policy-makers and scientists to assess what impact different facets of SD have in Arctic politics.
    Keywords: arctic governance ; science diplomacy ; collaboration ; competition ; qualitative content analysis
    Language: English
    Type: Article
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  • 7
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
    In:  Polar Record | Vol. 58 | Iss. (Art. No.:) e20 | p. 1-12 | Cambridge University Press | Cambridge | ISSN 1475-3057 | doi:10.1017/S0032247422000158
    Publication Date: 2023-03-12
    Description: It has been argued that science diplomacy (SD) helps avoid or mitigate conflicts among stakeholders in the Arctic. Yet underlying some of these well-intended and sometimes successful initiatives is a one-sided understanding of SD. The most recent literature takes a more differentiated approach towards the means and ends of SD. It shows that international scientific interaction is shaped by the twofold logic of competition and collaboration. Instruments of SD can be meant to serve national interests, collective regional goals or global agendas. The present paper disentangles these confounding discourses of collaboration and competition based on a conceptually enhanced SD framework. It analyses Arctic strategies and two cases of Arctic SD, the Agreement on Enhancing International Arctic Scientific Cooperation and research activities on Svalbard, to reveal the mechanisms of collaboration and competition in the sphere of international science in relation to security, environment and economy. By pointing out where and how science is currently being used in the Arctic, this article provides (a) a systematic overview of the state of SD in the region and (b) a tool for policy-makers and scientists to assess what impact different facets of SD have in Arctic politics.
    Keywords: arctic governance ; science diplomacy ; collaboration ; competition ; qualitative content analysis
    Language: English
    Type: Article
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  • 8
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
    In:  Polar Record | Vol. 58 | Iss. (Art. No.:) e20 | p. 1-12 | Cambridge University Press | Cambridge | ISSN 1475-3057 | doi:10.1017/S0032247422000158
    Publication Date: 2023-03-09
    Description: It has been argued that science diplomacy (SD) helps avoid or mitigate conflicts among stakeholders in the Arctic. Yet underlying some of these well-intended and sometimes successful initiatives is a one-sided understanding of SD. The most recent literature takes a more differentiated approach towards the means and ends of SD. It shows that international scientific interaction is shaped by the twofold logic of competition and collaboration. Instruments of SD can be meant to serve national interests, collective regional goals or global agendas. The present paper disentangles these confounding discourses of collaboration and competition based on a conceptually enhanced SD framework. It analyses Arctic strategies and two cases of Arctic SD, the Agreement on Enhancing International Arctic Scientific Cooperation and research activities on Svalbard, to reveal the mechanisms of collaboration and competition in the sphere of international science in relation to security, environment and economy. By pointing out where and how science is currently being used in the Arctic, this article provides (a) a systematic overview of the state of SD in the region and (b) a tool for policy-makers and scientists to assess what impact different facets of SD have in Arctic politics.
    Keywords: arctic governance ; science diplomacy ; collaboration ; competition ; qualitative content analysis
    Language: English
    Type: Article
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  • 9
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
    In:  Polar Record | Vol. 58 | Iss. (Art. No.:) e20 | p. 1-12 | Cambridge University Press | Cambridge | ISSN 1475-3057 | doi:10.1017/S0032247422000158
    Publication Date: 2023-03-04
    Description: It has been argued that science diplomacy (SD) helps avoid or mitigate conflicts among stakeholders in the Arctic. Yet underlying some of these well-intended and sometimes successful initiatives is a one-sided understanding of SD. The most recent literature takes a more differentiated approach towards the means and ends of SD. It shows that international scientific interaction is shaped by the twofold logic of competition and collaboration. Instruments of SD can be meant to serve national interests, collective regional goals or global agendas. The present paper disentangles these confounding discourses of collaboration and competition based on a conceptually enhanced SD framework. It analyses Arctic strategies and two cases of Arctic SD, the Agreement on Enhancing International Arctic Scientific Cooperation and research activities on Svalbard, to reveal the mechanisms of collaboration and competition in the sphere of international science in relation to security, environment and economy. By pointing out where and how science is currently being used in the Arctic, this article provides (a) a systematic overview of the state of SD in the region and (b) a tool for policy-makers and scientists to assess what impact different facets of SD have in Arctic politics.
    Keywords: arctic governance ; science diplomacy ; collaboration ; competition ; qualitative content analysis
    Language: English
    Type: Article
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  • 10
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
    In:  Polar Record | Vol. 58 | Iss. (Art. No.:) e20 | p. 1-12 | Cambridge University Press | Cambridge | ISSN 1475-3057 | doi:10.1017/S0032247422000158
    Publication Date: 2023-03-16
    Description: It has been argued that science diplomacy (SD) helps avoid or mitigate conflicts among stakeholders in the Arctic. Yet underlying some of these well-intended and sometimes successful initiatives is a one-sided understanding of SD. The most recent literature takes a more differentiated approach towards the means and ends of SD. It shows that international scientific interaction is shaped by the twofold logic of competition and collaboration. Instruments of SD can be meant to serve national interests, collective regional goals or global agendas. The present paper disentangles these confounding discourses of collaboration and competition based on a conceptually enhanced SD framework. It analyses Arctic strategies and two cases of Arctic SD, the Agreement on Enhancing International Arctic Scientific Cooperation and research activities on Svalbard, to reveal the mechanisms of collaboration and competition in the sphere of international science in relation to security, environment and economy. By pointing out where and how science is currently being used in the Arctic, this article provides (a) a systematic overview of the state of SD in the region and (b) a tool for policy-makers and scientists to assess what impact different facets of SD have in Arctic politics.
    Keywords: arctic governance ; science diplomacy ; collaboration ; competition ; qualitative content analysis
    Language: English
    Type: Article
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