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Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, Kiel

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  • facet.materialart.
    MISC
    In:  Annals of the University of Bucharest / Political science series | 16 | 1 | 25-38
    Publication Date: 2017-07-17
    Description: The article and its five propositions question the current performance and future strength of political science as a discipline. Its empirics are based on the book series ‘The World of Political Science’, published between 2006 and 2012, on the development and current state of the various sub-disciplines, asking the question of ‘why we are where we are’ in political science. The topics discussed in the first section on the discipline’s actual strength are the relationship between the United States, Europe and the rest of the world, the advances and challenges of the discipline, and the issue of fragmentation and specialization. The second section addresses the relevance of political science to society and politics and the third the impact of current politics on the discipline. The text was presented at a preparatory conference in Helsinki in December 2013 and will be further discussed during a special round-table session at the International Political Science Association’s world congress in Montreal in July 2014. The propositions are intended to trigger debate among political scientists.
    Keywords: Bildung und Erziehung ; Education ; Bildungswesen tertiärer Bereich ; Makroebene des Bildungswesens ; University Education ; Macroanalysis of the Education System, Economics of Education, Educational Policy ; Politikwissenschaft ; Fragmentierung ; Spezialisierung ; Bologna-Prozess ; Wissenschaftsdisziplin ; political science ; fragmentation ; specialization ; Bologna Process ; scientific discipline ; 10500
    Type: Zeitschriftenartikel , journal article
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  • Publication Date: 2018-05-30
    Description: Poverty remains a concern in both the global and the Indian context, with poverty reduction being a major objective of current development planning processes. Existing Knowledge Management and development literatures characterise knowledge as a driver for both economic and social growth. Current theoretical frameworks of Knowledge-Based Development (KBD) and Knowledge for Poverty Alleviation (KPA), while illuminating economic dimensions of knowledge management, tend to underplay the importance of social and community needs. Consequently, there is a need for a new conceptualisation of a knowledge-sharing approach that addresses social and community needs and contributes to poverty reduction. The aim of this thesis is to explore an alternative post-colonial approach to the application of knowledge management to development, focused on the problem of poverty reduction in the context of NGOs operating in Tamil Nadu. In pursuing this aim, a substantive theory is generated that captures new conceptual and practical insights about the application of knowledge-sharing as a means of poverty reduction and of enhancing capabilities. To this end, a qualitative research design was adopted because it is a methodology that examines a social problem, providing opportunities for representing it in its wholeness and complexity. In doing so, emphasis is placed on insights gained from the ideas and perspectives of participants. The analysis draws on multiple sources of data, ranging from face-to-face interviews, photographs, and observations, to print media collected over a one-year period spent in Tamil Nadu. The data are analysed using phenomenological techniques that are exploratory and explanatory in nature. From the analysis a Knowledge Sharing for Development (KS4D) framework emerged as a way of capturing a knowledge-sharing alternative. It conceptualises how NGOs can more effectively share knowledge in ways that do not compromise or challenge their organisational autonomy and independence. The analysis begins with a description of an emergent Basic Social Problem (BSP) in which the dimension of poverty in Tamil Nadu are explored. Then, a Basic Institutional Problem (BIP) is identified that provides a conceptual understanding of the problems associated with knowledge- sharing, faced by NGOs in Tamil Nadu. The analysis concludes with a description and explanation of the KS4D framework including its potential benefits to NGOs. This thesis contributes to theory in that the KS4D framework expands on current knowledge-sharing approaches to development, by exploring the concept from a post-colonial perspective. The BIP expands on current understanding of barriers to knowledge-sharing in the literature, outlining a fundamental problem faced by NGOs in Tamil Nadu. The BSP contributes to theory in that it expands on current poverty understanding and their interrelationships. This thesis contributes to practice in that the KS4D framework presents an approach for NGOs to come together and share knowledge towards achieving common aims, addressing the BIP. The KS4D framework further contributes to practice in that it increases the impact of NGOs on their poverty reduction work, affecting the BSP. The BSP in practice is useful, as it presents an updated concept of poverty, with both overarching and specific elements, forming the practical environment in which NGOs operate. Future research in assessing the KS4D framework and BIP and BSP concepts in their applications include testing and assessing them across other states in India and in other national contexts. Further research could also address the need to refine and delineate the factors and dimensions of KS4D.
    Keywords: Soziale Probleme und Sozialdienste ; Social problems and services ; Knowledge-sharing; Tamil Nadu ; soziale Probleme ; Social Problems ; nichtstaatliche Organisation ; Armutsbekämpfung ; Indien ; Region ; Bundesstaat ; soziales Problem ; Wissensmanagement ; Wissenserwerb ; Bildungsungleichheit ; soziale Ungleichheit ; geschlechtsspezifische Faktoren ; Entwicklungshilfepolitik ; Entwicklungshilfe ; soziale Konstruktion ; non-governmental organization ; combating poverty ; India ; region ; federal state ; social problem ; knowledge management ; knowledge acquisition ; educational inequality ; social inequality ; gender-specific factors ; development aid policy ; development aid ; social construction ; empirisch-qualitativ ; qualitative empirical ; 20500
    Type: Dissertation , phd thesis
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  • facet.materialart.
    MISC
    In:  AGROFOR International Journal | Agrofor International Journal | 2 | 3 | 61-70
    Publication Date: 2018-03-14
    Description: This paper presents four new strategies for growing the organic agriculture sector. Globally there are 51 million hectares of certified organic agriculture land and a further 39 million hectares of wild culture land. For the past two decades organic agriculture has been growing at 11.9% per annum, thereby doubling the size of the sector every six years. Nevertheless, despite ten decades of advocacy for organics, only 1.1% of the world’s agricultural land is certified organic. From the outset, the strategy has been to advance the sector ‘one farm at a time’. This strategy has left the organics sector well short of the vision of the pioneers of organics who saw organic farming as a universal solution and a practice suited for all farmers and all agriculture. Successful exemplars of marketing strategies of converting ‘one consumer at a time’ remain elusive. Recent years have seen the development of new strategies for growth of the organics sector. The strategy of ‘one crop at a time’ has proved successful for the Dominican Republic which now produces 55% of the world’s certified organic bananas. The strategy of ‘one state at a time’ has seen the state of Sikkim (in India) declare itself as the first Indian organic state. Meanwhile, other Indian states are working towards all-organic status, including Mizoram, Goa, Rajasthan and Meghalaya. The strategy of ‘one island at a time’ has seen the Pacific islands of Cicia (in Fiji) and Abaiang (in Kiribati) commit to 100% organic farming. The strategy of ‘one country at a time’ sees Bhutan with the stated goal of being the world’s first organic nation. These new strategies rely for success on the tripartite cooperation of government, community and commerce. In the meantime, as these new strategies play out, only 11 countries report that 10% or more of their agriculture land is organic, while 111 countries report that less than 1% of their land is certified organic, which reveals great potential for new growth strategies.
    Keywords: Wirtschaft ; Ökologie ; Economics ; Ecology ; Sikkim; Fiji; Kiribati ; Ökologie und Umwelt ; Wirtschaftssektoren ; Ecology, Environment ; Economic Sectors ; Bhutan ; organic farming ; sustainability ; Melanesia ; agriculture ; Micronesia ; India ; ökologischer Landbau ; Indien ; Mikronesien ; Melanesien ; Landwirtschaft ; Nachhaltigkeit ; Bhutan ; 10400
    Type: journal article , Zeitschriftenartikel
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